And yet, the topic of race and racialization in these interactions has been largely marginalized in academic work on the topic to claims and counter-claims about the extent to which “emerging actors” in Africa are “racist” vis-a-vis Europeans and even Africans themselves. In this panel, bringing together cultural historians and ethnographers, we address how race has been (re)produced and/or deconstructed in different sites of Afro-Global South interaction (and in representations of these interactions). How does racialization (and its intersections with gender and class) mediate uneveness/inequalities in interactions at multiple levels from state-projects to the trajectories of individual entrepreneurs? How is the policing of boundaries and interactions mediated by ethical discourse? How was race articulated in the intellectual work and popular cultural production of the Bandung moment, and what are its relations to the present? How have racialized discourses and practices, and the ways in which they are critiqued, shifted with the changing discourses over ethnicity, culture, civilization, quality, education accompanying the emergence of ostensibly alternative development models? How significant are whiteness and blackness in these spaces?

Submit proposals by e-mail at derek_sheridan[at]brown.edu. Preferably by the 13th so we can quickly notify possible attendees before the deadline.