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Blog Submission Guidelines

Welcome to the ASA blog!

Please note that blogs posted on this page represent the view of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the ASA or its Board of Directors.

We currently welcome article submissions from currently registered members of the ASA, relevant to the following thematic areas:

  • Current issues in African Studies and research
  • Refugees, Immigration, and Immigrants
  • Scholarship about, and by scholars from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen

Submissions from Africa-based members and women are particularly encouraged.

2017 Coordinate Organization Small Grants: Supporting the Igbo Studies Association International Annual Conference

By Ada Azodo, President, Igbo Studies Association

The Igbo Studies Association held its 15th Annual International Conference and meeting in Owerri, Nigeria, on June 8-10, 2017. The three-day conference at the Greatwood Hotel, Owerri, welcomed scholars and professionals from all parts of Nigeria, Europe, United States of America and Canada.

Part of the funding for the ISA conference and meeting in Owerri came from the African Studies Association’s 2017 small grant awards opportunity for Coordinate and Affiliate Organizations, supported by ASA’s 50th Anniversary Fund for activities ranging from conferences in Africa to travel expenses by scholars.

Next Steps in the Fight to #SavetheNEH

By: Beatrice Gurwitz

The African Studies Association is a member of the National Humanities Alliance (NHA). This blog comes from the series of columns the NHA authors to provide members with information about humanities advocacy.

Two days before President Trump’s inauguration, we awoke to reports that the transition team was contemplating a proposal to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). On March 16, after almost two months of near silence on the subject, the administration released a budget blueprint even more threatening to humanities programs than had been initially reported. The administration’s proposal not only recommends the elimination of the NEH and the NEA, but also the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Woodrow Wilson Center. Additionally, it calls for the “reduction or elimination” of the Department of Education’s Title VI and Fulbright-Hays programs.

Advocating for the Humanities in Washington, DC

The author of this blog post was awarded a travel grant to attend an advocacy conference in Washington, DC. This opportunity was available as part of the ASA Advocacy program. If you wish to see more opportunities for ASA members like this, please consider donating to the 60th Anniversary Campaign to support this, and other strategic initiatives.

By Nancy L. Clark

It is hard to imagine that African Studies would exist today as a robust and growing academic field without the support of many programs funded by US taxpayers. Most of us have enjoyed the benefits of these programs – through the NEH, NEA, NSF, Title VI, and Fulbright-Hays – and we would not have been able to pursue our scholarship without these resources. In a time of increasing inequality and insecurity throughout the world, these programs are more important than ever. And yet we find them under greater attack by a new administration and congress seemingly bent on building walls rather than bridges.

Advocating for International Education in Washington, DC

The author of this blog post was awarded a travel grant to attend an advocacy conference in Washington, DC. This opportunity was available as part of the ASA Advocacy program. If you wish to see more opportunities for ASA members like this, please consider donating to the 60th Anniversary Campaign to support this, and other strategic initiatives.

By Andreana Prichard

In late February, I received word from the ASA that I had received one of two $1000 travel subsidy grants to travel to D.C. to attend one of three advocacy conferences geared toward supporting international education and humanities. I had seen the call earlier in the month, but I didn’t take it seriously as something that I could do until my colleague noted that the ASA was looking for advocates from Oklahoma and encouraged me to apply. I had done some local-level advocacy before applying: I’m involved with our neighborhood association and have done trainings with the Neighborhood Alliance of Central Oklahoma; I have started attending ward and town hall meetings, and even speaking at some; and I speak with our Police Community Relations officer about issues concerning our neighborhood probably more often than he would like. I’d also recently started making daily calls to legislators, signing petitions that come through my inbox and over Facebook, and sending postcards. But doing in-person advocacy on a national level was entirely new to me.

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African Studies Association is a participating member of Aid for Africa, a unique partnership of nonprofit organizations serving families and communities throughout Africa.
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